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March 20, 2012

Comments

chris

Great piece to promote a needed conversation regarding the future of faith as influenced by technology.

It is good to hear about the Sweet book and its emphasis on connectiveness using the signature method of Jesus, storytelling.
We will need to quickly develop new wine flasks of spiritual ecosystem that will create a spiritual experience that will foster collaboration, and closeness to deliver a worship-filled experience.

The broadcast, proclamation method of the preacher role would need to be modified and give way to the priestly qualities of connector and the shepherd-like qualities of a spiritual journey into pastoral spaces.


The anywhere, always on world will let many crave for digitally quiet, sacred spaces. Smart churches will create such spaces within their edifices. Grace-filled protocols of being unplugged and digital fast will become mainstream.


Permit me to suggest several additional books that develop the concept of virtual closeness.
• Tribes by Seth Godin
• Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki
• Open Leadership by Charlene Li

Monte

Have you thought about some basic, practical questions: How will people pray? Will they do so through Twitter or chat or texting or prayer web sites? How will people praise God; we have traditionally done that by singing hymns or praise songs, with testimonies and ritual dialog of various kinds, including responsive readings or litanies. Reading Scripture outloud in a "chant" was technologically useful in a time when people did not have copies of Bibles and a litany helped them memorize or at least remember key texts. What is a use of Scripture which is important in today's technology that serves a similar, but not parallel, practical, spiritual purpose?

chris

I have seen stats that indicate that there are more people in museums on week-end in the western world than there are church goers. The human experience here has a spiritual component.
I also add that one of the attributes of religion is constancy where practice is fused with convictions in the minds of most, and driven by established rituals and practices.


I share those set up points to say that until new technologies crosses some high touch threshold and are baptized as sacred, the current rituals will be mainstream and twitter prayers will be practiced at the margins, para-church settings et al. Human socialization will increase in value as technology advances and disrupts.

The torrid pace of technological change will be muted by the on the ground human pace of broad-based adoption, struggles with rejection (Think neo-Amish) and ritualization.

The week-end corporate worship program will thus practiced with the familiar style of today but broadcasted and commented on using mobile and social technologies.
Communication, education, and entertainment institutions will be more ready adopters. I can image plays being done in 3D creating conversations with our favorite Bible characters.

This prophet has spoken! lol

chris

Allow me to add this element to the dialog.

http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/04/is_your_smartphone_making_you.html?referral=00563&cm_mmc=email-_-newsletter-_-daily_alert-_-alert_date&utm_source=newsletter_daily_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert_date

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